Category Archives: Guide For Improving Quality of Food & Water Blog

Diabetic Jihad

diabetic jihad

Living in modern times is super scary.  There is a holy war going on and Muslims are imposing their will on the American public.  It’s time to start thinking about our children before they get their heads chopped off to appease the Koran.  Donald Trump knows what is best for our country.  It’s time to build a wall and kick out the Muslims.

I have been searching for an analogy to explain how it feels to raise a child with type 1 diabetes and saw a correlation with the Muslim religion.  Much like the Muslim religion, diabetes is generalized and misunderstood.  If you have an extreme passion for caring for your child or read the Koran, you may be considered a terrorist.  I will not be voting for Donald Trump, but understand the concept of putting up a wall.  I have done an excellent job of alienating people who do not believe in the way I chose to manage diabetes.

My son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 3 years old.  I have been managing his diabetes for over 2 years and still do not understand Gods will.  I am aware that I am struggling and striving to manage my son’s diabetes the best I can.  The Arabic translation for Jihad means to struggle and strive, while most people associate the word to mean “Holy War”.  I can relate to struggling and striving; and understand the impact diabetes management has on family life.   I am not Muslim, but am often misinterpreted, and have created my own holy war.

I remember the first couple times I took my son for his 3 month follow up appointments. The nurses would draw his blood for an A1c test that measures his blood glucose average for the previous 3 months.  The A1c test was my report card for how I was treating my son’s diabetes.  I quickly learned that I was failing my son.  Unlike receiving a failing grade on a college exam, my failures meant that I was hurting my son physically and psychologically . How do caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes deal with the feeling of failure?

I did not take failure very well.  I blamed myself for my son acquiring type 1 diabetes.   I convinced myself that his diabetes must have been from something I fed him, immunization shots, or something else that I subjected him too.  I thought the easiest way to deal with his diabetes was to admit that “I gave my 3 year old son type 1 diabetes”. Someone had to be accountable, and I put that burden on myself.   What could I do to make up for the pain I caused my son?

I have a degree in nutrition and decided that I was going to redeem myself by giving him the best care possible.  I prayed to God everyday to help me cure my son’s diabetes.  I honestly believed that diabetes could be reversed.   I became obsessed with nutrition literature, meal planning, and treated diabetes management with military precision.  I nominated myself to become a diabetes caliph and was ready to impose my beliefs on anyone that was part of my son’s life.  I became a diabetes extremist and assumed everybody had the ability to manage diabetes to my specifications.

Now I was ready for invasion.  The first territory I decided to invade was my wife and mother in law.  I had good intentions to share my knowledge and passion for my son, but quickly got angered when people were not living up to my expectations.  I assumed everyone would be receptive to my care plan, and thought they were acting in spite of me when things didn’t go as planned.  I treated people in my life like infidels.  My biggest weapon of mass destruction was my inability to practice discretion.  The emotional damage I caused was fierce and had many casualites.  What impact does this type of behavior have on families trying to raise a child with type 1 diabetes?

My son’s numbers improved dramatically but I was not happy.  The endocrinologist told me that my son had an excellent A1c but that was not good enough.  I wanted total control and was not content with doing a good job of managing his diabetes.  I wanted a flawless care plan and still had hopes for a cure.  The people around me were afraid to grocery shop, prepare meals, vocalize their opinion, and quickly became passive aggressive.   I made people feel bad for taking care of my children.  I became obsessed with food choices and started invading other territories.  I had conversations with neighbors about not giving my children snacks.  I voiced my displeasure with the library for serving my children snacks at book club, and contacted the school to protest the ice-cream social on registration day.  I became a dictator and hurt the people around me.  What did I learn after the smoke settled and I started counting the casualties.

I will never be able to control my son’s type 1 diabetes.  I did an excellent job of managing my son’s diabetes but made the people in my life miserable.  A red dye Popsicle from my neighbor is not going to kill my children.  I learned to be content with the fact that I managed my son’s diabetes well.   I was the one cooking breakfast, lunch, and dinner and had the most impact on my sons diabetes.  A hot dog from my wife on the weekend was not going to hurt my son.  I learned that diabetes is emotionally draining and families should seek counseling right away.

I wrote this blog after I realized that I needed help.  My depression grew deeper and deeper as I alienated the most important people in my life.  If I were to give any advice to a new family trying to deal with the stress of managing diabetes, I would tell them to sign up for family counseling as soon as possible.  Do not blame yourself for the diabetes.  Trying to control diabetes will tear your family apart.  Learning to manage the diabetes with the people in your lives is crucial.  The psychological effect diabetes has on caregivers and family is one of the most important issues to address.  Caregivers need support and someone to talk with.   Love and care for your family and do not push them away.

Peace out! Gotta bounce.  I need to arrest an infidel for giving my son artificial sweeteners.

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Meninist Movement For Stay-At-Home Dads

Meninist Movement For Stay-At-Home Dads!

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I’m so tired of women talking about my sweet ass every time I drop off my children at soccer practice.  I can’t take my kids to the library anymore without some ignorant bitch trying to fondle my package.  Don’t get me started talking about sexual discrimination in the work place!  I don’t know how many times I got passed up on a job because some woman had a sweet ass and nice tits.  No wonder why drag is so popular!  I understand Bruce Jenner.  Life would be so much easier if I had some boobs and a vagina.  How long will it be before we stop the persecution of dads?

I tip my hat to the feminist movement.  The multiple battles confronted to advance women’s rights displays the courage of women and exemplifies the struggles of self fulfillment.   The hardships women overcame during the feminist movement is nothing to be sarcastic about.  A woman’s role in life should not be limited to serving her husband, taking care of children, having sex, and performing domestic chores.   A woman should be respected for whatever role is best for the family.  The notion of women being equal to men is widely accepted in civilized societies.  The feminist movement had a dramatic impact on family dynamics and helped women gain the respect they deserved.

I do not have women telling me that I have a sweet ass at the grocery store.  Women do not grope my package in public.  Mentioning a woman having a sweet ass and nice tits is misogynistic and proves that women still face discrimination after all of the progress from the feminist movement.  Having a vagina and boobs does not make life easier.  We are lucky to live in a society that has learned to protect and respect women.  Good men respect women.  Good dads teach their son’s to respect women.  Do women respect men?Did the Alpha female bring us back to the 1950’s?  Do wives know how to respect stay-at- home dads?

“Mommy Mommy!  What does daddy do?” asked a 10 year old boy?  Well that easy Johnny! Daddy gets you ready for school in the morning, keeps the house clean, makes dinner, and changes the babies diapers.  A good father takes care of children while living up to the ideals of the 1950’s.   A good man buys the woman flowers, takes her on dates,  makes babies whenever the woman wants, and spends 55 hours per week doing domestic chores.  A good father stays at home with the kids until kindergarten; and than he needs to start making money.  A good man bows down to his queen and offers her emotional support for her work stress.  Now get in the kitchen and make me a sandwich peasant boy!  Women have become very convincing at having it both ways!

The discrimination fathers face in the 21st century is not as transparent as the injustice women were subjected to before the feminist movement.  I am stay-at-home dad and like to write about my experiences raising my children.  I have been searching for a medium to describe my role of a stay-at-home dad and was immediately drawn to the feminist movement.  I was able to relate to the role of a mother from the 1950’s and her struggles for recognition.  The struggles stay-at-home dads are confronted with are serious but may never be acknowledged?  I realized that stay-at-home moms have more rights than stay-at-home dads and get more respect.  Not to many people have realized how the feminist movement steam rolled modern day stay-at-home dads?

A mother in the 1950’s was respected if she served her husband, did her chores, and took care of the children.  The husband took her out on dates, bought her flowers, and was aware of the emotions of raising children.  Mothers didn’t have their parents and in-laws asking  them what job they were going to get after the children started school.  Mothers didn’t have the stigma of doing something wrong because they were not making money.  Women in the 1950’s and future generations have been respected for fulfilling their role of a stay-at-home mom.  Fathers have been trying to find their place in society since women gained respect in the work force.  There are higher expectations for stay-at-home dads, less emotional support, and very little understanding.

I love my role of a stay at home dad.  Staying at home with children is the most rewarding job in the world.  I often feel guilty that I was unable to be a better provider for my family.  I feel like I did something wrong after my wife took the lead role.  These feelings were instilled in me during my childhood.  Society still embraces the notion that men should be the bread winners of the family.  Stay at home fathers frequently hear comments that reinforce the stereotype that men should be working and women should stay at home with children.  Can I please concentrate on raising my children, supporting my wife during graduate school, and figure out how to deal with the emotions of raising children without someone asking me, “Where are you going to work when the kids are in school?”  Will stay-at-home dads ever get any respect?  Can fathers talk about their emotions?

Women can find time to hang out with friends but are 1950’s old fashioned when it comes to taking their husbands out.  I do not have any money.  I wear sweat pants everyday.  I am exhausted from raising children.  I feel guilty spending money.  Do I need to get a part time job for romance?  Is it wrong for me to say “she never buys me flowers.  Am I wrong for thinking a wife should go out with her husband more than her friends?  Do fathers deserve more recognition for staying at home with children?  Can we silence the stereotypes, learn to support fathers, and embrace the feelings of men?  How can we stop the discrimination towards fathers and balance the dynamics of families?    

It’s time for a revolution!  We need to fight for father’s rights!                                              Support the Meninist Movement!

Peace out! Gotta Bounce!  My wife just got back from her pedicure and she wants me to make her a sandwich.

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I Didn’t Buy Her Flowers (Life of a Stay-at-Home-Dad)

dead flowers

The one word that comes to mind when I think about my mother raising our family is Struggle.  

The struggle was real, and the people in our lives were aware that my mother needed help.

The people involved in my life taught me compassion, empathy, and most of all acceptance.

I accepted the struggles of my family, and was taught to respect women and the role of motherhood.   Empathy was instilled in me when I heard relatives  say, “your poor mom never gets a break” – “Your dad is always at work and that is hard on your mom” – “Be easy on your mother, she does a lot for you kids”.   I learned at an early age that the stress of raising children had an effect on my mom’s behavior, and that stress from work had an impact on my father.

My parents fought a lot when I was a child and I was aware of the struggles of raising children.

My father worked a lot during my early childhood and his role was limited to providing for the family.  He was a workaholic and we always needed more money.  His role as a provider was widely accepted and he fit in very well with his era.

I knew at an early age that taking care of children was hard work.   Where was my Dad’s empathy?  Why was he yelling at my mom about his his hair brush being out of place?   Doesn’t he know that my little brother peed in the dressing room today, and my Mom just got home from cheer-leading practice?  Dinner didn’t make itself, and my poor mom hasn’t had a break all day.  I can still hear the voices in my head saying “Stick up for your mother”. My mom had people in her corner and their voices had an influence on the admiration and appreciation I have for my mom.

I never understood my parents arguing when I was child, but my father did teach me about compassion.  My Dad always brought my mom home flowers on days the tensions of family life got out of control.   I knew my dad was sorry for his actions and acknowledging his mistakes seemed to comfort my mom.

I never understood how my parents found a way to love each other after their crazy fights.  I just knew my dad brought home flowers and that seemed to work for a while.  My dad was a repeat offender and the the arguments ensued throughout my childhood until my parents got divorced.   The divorce was all my dads fault in my childhood mind and I just wanted things to get better for my mom.

My perspective of marriage and raising children changed dramatically when I brought my own children into the world.

Being a stay at home dad in the 21st century is nothing like the life I knew growing up. There is no empathy, compassion, or understanding of what it is like to be a stay at home dad.   Women got respect in the workforce while stay-at-home-dads have no place in the world.   Sometimes I think I would be better off being kidnapped by ISIS.  At least the suffering would stop when they chop off my head.

I do not get the respect my mom was afforded.  I do not have relatives feeling the need to help me.  People do not reach out to me and ask me how I am feeling.   Besides, my parents are to busy helping out my sisters.   Men are supposed to be strong and it’s absurd to think dads need help raising their children.  Watch the kids, cook them food, clean up their mess, but don’t think for one minute that your allowed to have emotions.

Don’t believe me?  Try telling your wife that she hurt your feelings.  Try suggesting that having a bad day with the children can effect your mood or behavior.   Do not be mad at today’s working mom, she was never taught how to have empathy for her father.  I do not have relatives telling my children “be nice to your father, he has a lot of stress”   You will never hear my parents or in-laws tell my wife “Your poor husband hasn’t had a break all day”.

My son has type 1 diabetes and I cry on days his sugars are out of control.  I do not feel comfortable sharing my feelings because it is not allowed or accepted.  People may say that a man is allowed to be vulnerable and emotional, but society has not found a way to comfort him.  There are several misconceptions and stereotypes that prevent men from being respected for their role of a stay at home dad.

I need comfort but do not get it from my wife because she was not taught the same principles I learned growing up.  Compassion for fathers was not instilled in most women.   She learned that her father went to work and provided for the family.  She watched her father bring home flowers when he was trying to make her mother feel better.   She witnessed her grandma and aunts being there for her mom but does not understand why the father of her children needs the same help.  Society does not understand the struggles of being a stay at home dad.  Did I understand the struggles of my wife being the provider?

I never realized how sad it was to be away from the kids until my wife and I got separated and I went 3 days without seeing my children.  I have never cried so much in my life during those 3 days.  I had an epiphany and realized the depression my wife endured being away from the children was something I failed to realize.  I was familiar with the feelings of my mother growing up, but never put much thought into the feelings of my father.  He spent most of  his time working and I was not aware of his feelings.  I was not aware of my wife’s feelings until it was to late.

My wife and I are going through the process of divorce and I cannot go one day without analyzing where our marriage failed.  I spent the past 5 years of my life searching for recognition and trying to deal with the feeling of failure for not being a financial provider.  I did a wonderful job of being a stay at home dad but failed to realize women in the workforce still have strong emotions that need attention and comfort.  You cannot expect a working mother with young children to have a role limited to being a provider.   Women still need the emotional support which is hard to provide if your a dad striving for acceptance.  We did not understand the role reversal of modern times in time to save our marriage.

I do not have the same luxury of sharing my feelings because I was taught that emotions from a man are taboo.  My wife and I had some of the same struggles I witnessed in my childhood with one exception.

I didn’t buy her flowers.

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Exile on Romaine Street

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Exile on Romaine Street

I’m sitting in a fetal position crying hysterically in the middle of a busy street and people won’t stop punching and kicking me.  I begged for sutures to heal the cuts and wounds all over my body and I was doused with salt.  I tried calling my wife, family, and friends for help but nobody responded.  THEY COULD LEAVE ME TO DIE FOR ALL I CARE!  I just want someone to pick up the children and make sure they are safe.  I cannot handle this anymore!  I do not want to raise my children like everyone else.

I have this parody in my head that involves parents, school administrators, activity directors, and daycare workers forming a huge line as I proceed to slap each one of them in the face repeatedly.  I do not condone violence and simply utilize my parody to alleviate the frustration I feel towards institutions that indirectly hurt children.  Does my son really need juice and fishy crackers during his 90 minute preschool class?  Perhaps I am cynical?   Maybe I should give up trying to fix everything that is wrong for my children?  Is there anything to be gained from feeding my children healthy foods?  Did I just get a divorce because of romaine lettuce?

It is difficult raising children in a society that does not understand the correlation between corporate profits and the rising epidemic of autoimmune disease in children.   I am stay at home dad with 3 children and caregiver to my son who suffers from type 1 diabetes.  I have not been the same since “I gave my 3-year-old son type 1 diabetes”.   I refuse to feed my children processed food and I make everything from scratch.  I am very concerned about pesticides, medications, vaccinations, and multi billion dollar corporations.  Did you hear my stance on the flu shot?  Why don’t the kids have a dinner salad?

Feeding your children organic unprocessed foods requires dedication, determination, and creativity.  It can be frustrating when all of your efforts at home are wiped out by opposing viewpoints from family, schools, and other parents.  I yelled at my kids for eating cheese puffs and juice at the library during book club.  I gave my wife an earful of resentment for not feeding the children a dinner salad when I already had the romaine lettuce prepped in the fridge.  I am writing Pope Francis letters asking him why the body of Christ is infested with pesticides?  “All praise the Atheist Diet”  Maybe I took this to far?

I can’t stop thinking about the day I yelled at my children for eating cheese puffs.  I was mad at my wife because I wanted her to be more receptive to the nutrition goals I have for my children.   I was mad at the library for offering my children snacks when I was so excited about someone reading to my children.  I was mad because I do not have many people who can relate to what I am going through.  I blamed the Cheese puffs and juice for my son’s sugar being 362.   I am angry because people are not very sympathetic to the needs of diabetics.  Why does my family need to be surrounded by children eating ice-cream on the day students meet their teachers?  How is my son supposed to take control of his diabetes when the world is trying to shove sugar down his throat?

I put a lot of pressure on myself to get control of my son’s type 1 diabetes.  I have goals of getting better control of his blood sugar that seem to vanish every time I walk out the front door.  Schools in America do a very poor job promoting childhood nutrition.  The principle of my daughters school allows an ice-cream social on school grounds 1 hour before meeting the teachers.  If students get perfect attendance in school they get a trip to Burger King.  Children are dying of cancer and suffering from autoimmune diseases while schools are taking  donations and supporting the same companies that are causing our children to suffer.   I’m starting to get frustrated again!  Is there a healthy solution?

Trying to promote childhood nutrition can be a brutal process.  Maybe I exaggerated a little bit when I said I was sitting in a fetal position being punched and kicked with salt being poured on my wounds.  Getting people to respect your parenting decisions can be torture when you feel like everyone is against you.   Keep your head up and never stop fighting for your children.   I talked to the woman who served cheese puffs and juice at book club and had a nice discussion about childhood nutrition.  I apologized to my children for yelling at them for eating cheese puffs and to my wife for getting mad over romaine lettuce.  I have realized that I cannot control my children forever but I can teach them how to make better choices.  I will keep sharing my stories and can only hope the world will do a better job of protecting our children.

Peace Out!  “Bread Not Bombs” Gotta Go,  If I don’t get my 2 year old a Mountain Dew and a bag of Flamin Hot Cheetos! She will go Bizerk!

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All Praise The Atheist Diet

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All Praise The Atheist Diet

I often wonder if telling people how you feel is worth it anymore?  Do people still listen to one another?  Society has put their faith in science and we now have answers for everything.  People should keep their beliefs to themselves unless they have strong empirical evidence to support their claim.  We have billions of dollars in studies that prove our food, water, and pharmaceuticals are safe.  Did you write a scientific journal?  Do you have a Doctorate degree?  Are you a politician?  Shut up and eat the forbidden fruit.

Am I allowed to believe in something I cannot prove?  Should I ignore my feelings if science contradicts them?  I get a warm fuzzy feeling every time I imagine God creating the heavens and earth.  “Now no shrub had yet appeared on the earth and no plant had yet sprung up, for the Lord God had not sent rain on the earth and there was no one to work the ground”-Genesis 2:5.  Tears come to my eyes just thinking about the Garden of Eden.  I want to believe in Adam and Eve.  I cannot find sanctuary in science.

I do not want to leave the Garden of Eden I created in my head.  My wife is always naked and the fruits and vegetables are way better than the organic produce at Whole foods.  I don’t see any airplanes spraying chem-trails and I have no fears of government.  None of the animals or foods are infested with poisons and our youth is not ravished with disease. Common core math does not exist and neither do immunizations.  Why did Eve have to eat from the tree of knowledge of good and evil?

I can hear the critics speaking now.  That guy is an idiot.  Everyone knows Adam and Eve was a fable!  There is no evidence God is real.  Monsanto makes better fruits and vegetables than your God could ever produce.  I vote for the DARK ACT.  There is no need for a Malathion, Chlorpyrifos methyl, Methoxychlor p,p’, or Piperonyl butoxide pesticide label on your church communion wafers.  Its none of your business if the Catholic church is feeding parishioners pesticides?  The body of Christ  may or may not be contaminated?  Are church nutrition labels telling lies?  None of that matters now that science gives us better answers than God.  All praise the Atheist diet.

I want my children to eat from the tree of life and share the wonderful stories of Genesis.  I found happiness teaching my children how God created fruits, vegetables, livestock, and natural resources.  How God said from Genesis 1:29, “I now give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the entire earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food”.  How can I teach my children a genetically modified apple is sacred?

I live everyday of my life wishing I could have done a better job protecting my son from Type 1 Diabetes.  I put blind faith in our food supply, healthcare system, pharmaceuticals, and vaccinations because faith in God was never published in a scientific journal.  I’m supposed to believe an unknown virus caused my son’s body to stop producing insulin and that doctors know the best way to treat him.  Have mercy on me Lord GMO for not putting my faith in a multi billion dollar industry.  I need Asylum from science.

The happiness of a child has no correlation with fast food places with playgrounds, excessive sugar intake, or convenient processed foods.  Don’t ever let anyone make you feel bad for trying to protect your children from Science.   I will put my blind faith in God and cast my doubt on Nutrition Labels.  Never be afraid to share your beliefs!  I believe God can save our children once we stop putting blind faith in science.

Peace Out, Bread Not Bombs!                                                                                                                   Gotta go work on my campaign for Organic Twinkies & Ho Ho’s.

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I GAVE MY 3 YEAR OLD SON TYPE 1 DIABETES

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I GAVE MY 3 YEAR OLD SON TYPE 1 DIABETES.

I have to pinch myself everyday to make sure I’m not dreaming.  My life is innocent, filled with love, and I never know what the day will bring.  I get more hugs and kisses on a daily basis than most people get in their lifetime.  I do not know how I landed this killer position! I have never had a job that made me feel this good in my entire life.  Being a stay at home dad for my 3 children is awesome!!!

I left corporate America and ventured into the life of a stay at home dad the day my son was born.  What a great feeling of not having to answer to the boss anymore!  I was the CEO of my own household.  I no longer needed to seek approval from a higher power and was free to make my own decisions.  I was feeling invincible up until the day my wife went back to school and I realized what I was in for.  The decisions I was making on a daily basis had a bigger impact on my family’s health than I could ever imagine.

The toughest part of raising my children was trying to find a balance between life at home with the kids and a lingering expectation of making money and having a social life.   “There’s only 24 hours in a day” is a great slogan for any parent.  My kids needed to eat 3 times a day and I still had my agenda.  How am I going to feed my children?  Canned goods, frozen pizza, red dye, blue dye, yellow dye, high corn fructose sugar, hydrogenated oils, natural flavor, artificial flavor, pesticides, gmo’s.  It didn’t matter.  The principles of feeding my children were influenced by convenience and sales price.

I gave my 3-year-old son Type 1 diabetes and nobody can tell me different in my eyes. There is a price being paid for convenience and our children are getting the bill.  Blue, red, and yellow dyes are banned in Europe but parents in America don’t mind dyes in children’s snacks.  China refuses to buy pork from the USA because of the dangers of Ractopamine but that has no effect on America’s love for bacon.  Scientists were using Alloxan to induce type 1 diabetes in lab rats during the same time I was giving it to my boy when I fed him products with bleached white flour.  How did America become this disenchanted with our food and water?

We lend our trust in politicians, lawyers, pharmaceutical companies, and big corporations while they devastate our health and resources in exchange for more money than anyone could possibly ever spend.  We are fooled by deceptive labeling and don’t  have a clue what we are feeding our children.  We ignore the voices of the nutritionist, natural healers, fitness professionals, farmers, social workers, moms, dads, teachers and people who want to make a change.  Giving our children pills is easier and more convenient than seeing the correlation between foods and disease.  Hearing its hereditary from a doctor is easier to accept than hearing your lazy from me.

I gave my 3-year-old diabetes and I take full blame.  Two years after being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes my son asked me when the doctor was going to take his pump off and it broke my heart when I couldn’t answer him.  Most people are waiting on a magic pill while I believe we need healthy foods.  My sons organs need time to heal and a break from all the toxins and poisons we have been feeding him.  Getting someone to believe type 1 diabetes can be cured with food is hard for anyone to swallow when its coming from a stay at home dad that does not have a doctorate degree.  How can I possibly make a change when the world is against me?

Telling your parents and in-law’s they are not allowed to feed your children fast food does not get you much respect.  Tell your neighbors to stop offering your kids poison popsicle’s and see how popular you are in your neighborhood.  My wife and I had a discussion about not feeding our children Soy Lecithin and 2 minutes later she sent me an article about the benefits of soy.   My little brother is an advocate of aspartame and I will probably get sued if I do not state that none of the ingredients listed above have shown any impact on health. Is all Hope Lost?

People have realized the need for change but feel powerless.  How can we possibly fight against the food industry and large corporations?  We can start by changing the dynamics of family and community.  Making food from scratch and refusing to buy unhealthy products puts pressure on companies putting harmful ingredients in our food.  I have hope that the people around me in my life accept the fact that I gave my 3-year-old son type 1 diabetes and help me to give him the best care possible.  I have hope that society embraces the food babes, wellness mama, smart soaps suds, and other true heroes of our generation who are fighting for a positive change.

Peace out!  Bread not Bombs! Just bought a bottle of Henri IV Dudognon Heritage Cognac and my boo be cooking Lobster!

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ORGANIC GOVERNMENT CHEESE PIZZA

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Who knows where my family would be today if it wasn’t for the Da Gubment?  I can still remember picking up bricks of government cheese from the local town square with my mother and the unpleasant look on her face when she was mixing up dried powdered milk.   We ate bologna sandwiches for lunch and spaghetti for dinner.   My mom started nursing school after my parents divorced and received food stamps to help feed our family.

Fast forward 25 years and I revisit the struggle of feeding my own children.   My family is not drinking powdered milk and I don’t want to feed my children processed cheese.   I choose not to feed my children wood pulp bargain breads made with 25 different ingredients that are super hard to pronounce.   The mere sight of ‘natural flavor’ on an ingredient list raises my blood pressure 80 points.  Yes,  I receive food assistance from the government!  Does this mean I shouldn’t be allowed to buy organic vanilla extract from Madagascar?

Should standards of food be based on socioeconomic status?  If an Organic cheese pizza cost $30 dollars today; how much is it going to cost your children 20 years from now?   Can middle class families afford organic food today? –No.   Most middle class Americans have more in common with welfare recipients than they realize.  The socioeconomic gap between middle and lower class citizens is collapsing before our eyes.  Organic food is reserved for the rich;  while GMO’s, pesticides, and antibiotic ridden foods are being served to second class citizens.   How can anyone fight back?

Buy a big bag of organic wheat flour, organic tomato sauce, pick some vegetables from your garden, and make some organic pizza with your family.  Making food at home creates an awesome experience for children, helps boost your food budget, and puts pressure on big corporations to produce healthier products.  My family makes organic pizzas for less than $4 each and they love the pizza!  We are teaching our children about healthy ingredients and preventing them from eating ingredients that rich people are avoiding.   None of the ingredients listed below have any impact on health and are deemed safe to consume by the FDA.

Do not accept giving your children BHA, BHT, MSG, Modified Food starch, Maltodextrin, Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten, Disodium Inosinate /Guanylate, Natural Flavor and countless other preservatives found in pizza.    Follow my recipe, share it with your friends, and the food revolution will begin.  “If 4 million families were to make their own pizzas during the months of October and November,  companies will start removing the ingredients rich people are scared to eat.”  If you do not think drug testing welfare recipients  and deporting illegals will solve the worlds problems, than maybe making pizza from scratch doesn’t sound like such a bad idea.

Please check out the foodbabe.com  for some great information on what ingredients they are putting in your favorite take out pizza.  Bounce!  My baby mamma is cooking Chateaubriand tonight and I need to get back to the PS4.

 

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The following recipe is for 1 large pizza.

1.  Heat 2/3 cups water in microwave to 115 degrees Fahrenheit.   Add water to large mixing bowl and have  your children call you when the water  reaches 110 degrees.  This is a great trick for buying a little time to clean up or get your ingredients together.

2.   Add 1 Tablespoon of Organic Cane Sugar, 1 Tablespoon Yeast, and 1/4 TSP salt to mixing bowl and mix until well blended.   If you have children let them mix up the yeast and enjoy the commotion the stinky yeast will cause.  Take 5-10 minutes to prepare your toppings while the yeast works on the sugar and the kids hold their noses and mix away.

3.  Add 1 cup organic all purpose flour,  1/2 cup organic whole wheat flour, and 1 tablespoon organic ground flax seed to mixing bowl.  Mix the ingredients in bowl until dough forms into ball.

4.  Add remaining 1/2 cup of Organic all purpose flour during the kneading process.  This is a great time to educate your children on healthy ingredients and food preparation.

6. Form the dough into ball, brush with thin layer of olive oil, and let the dough rest for 10-15 minutes.  I like to heat oven to 105 degrees and shut off instantly.  Place your dough in oven, cover with towel, and let the dough rise for 10-15 minutes.  Dough rises very well at 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

7.  Take the dough out of the oven and get ready to roll it out.  I use a coffee thermos to roll out the bread because I am too cheap to buy a rolling pin.  After you roll the pizza out to the diameter of your pizza pan you can fold the overlapping dough over for a nice crust.   Now is a good time to preheat oven to 375.

8.  Add 2 ounces of homemade organic pizza sauce and spread the sauce along the diameter of pizza evenly.   Add any additional toppings and cover with 3 oz of Organic mozzarella cheese.

9.  Bake at 375 degrees for approximately 15 minutes.

10.  Take out of oven and enjoy!

The pizza dough in this recipe has been slightly modified from original recipe.  P

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Maybe Some Day She Will Love My Bread!

 

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Most of my day I spend wondering how much longer until I reach my breaking point?  Here in Chicago we have 3 months of extreme cold and 3 months of sweltering heat.   It can be challenging watching 3 children when your stuck in the house from rain, snow, and sun.   I am thankful the song “Lets make a rainbow” helped me get my house clean;  but if my kids watch another episode of Care Bears, I will definitely reach my breaking point.

Did I really think checking Facebook would make me feel better?  It seems like every parent in the world is taking their kids to water parks or Disneyland while I try to figure how to get my van fixed.   I wish I had more time, energy, and money to do things with my kids.  I’m tired of always feeling guilty for not doing more with the kids?  I feel like a terrible father. I wish I had 20 bucks for the jumpy place.  Shame on me for letting them watch Netflix for 3 hours!

Steam protrudes from my head as I yell “turn off the TV”.   Call me grumpy bear because I’m not making any more rainbows.  “We are going to make some whole wheat bread” I exclaimed!!!!  My 6 year old instantly starting twitching from Netflix withdrawal and sadly proclaimed, “I don’t want to make bread”.   I told my daughter she didn’t have to make bread and walked away.  This was not what I intended.   I wanted this to be a positive experience.

Luckily my 2 year old and 4 year old were much more interested.   I gave my 2 year old daughter a wooden spoon and she was super happy.    Elsa, Anna or Olaf couldn’t  have competed with that wooden spoon if they tried.   It’s really funny when you think about how little it takes to bring happiness to a child.   My 4 year old son was super excited when I showed him the digital thermometer he was going to be using.  It wasn’t long  before my pouting daughter took interest in making the bread.

I put a cup of  115 degrees water on the table and told the kids to call me when it cooled down to 110 degrees.  This bought me enough time to get my ingredients together and clean up my kitchen area.  It was nice to hear my daughter and son starting to share some excitement and talk with one another.  Sure my 2 year old was banging everything in the house with a spoon but things were staring to look up.  “Daddy, Daddy its 110, its 110″ exclaimed my now happy daughter.   It was a good feeling making a connection with my children and finding something that made them happy.

When I came to the table with flour, sugar, milk, and other ingredients; I had their full attention.  Who would have thought the stinky yeast would be so much fun. The kids couldn’t wait to add more ingredients to the mixing bowl.  “I want to add the salt, I want to stir, I want to stir now daddy it’s my turn!!!”  yelled the children with smiles on their faces.   The excitement grew faster than the flour could rise when I told the children to stick their hands in the dough and play.   It was a lot of fun showing them how to knead the dough and seeing their reaction when the bread came out of the oven.

I have a huge mess to clean but cannot wait to make bread with my family again. My daughter is pouting and will not eat my bread because yogurt was one of the ingredients.  The very next week I tried a recipe without yogurt and she still didn’t like the bread.  I have tried several recipes but she never likes my bread.  She does like my cinnamon roles and it is nice to know she is learning about ingredients.   My 2 year old told me my pizza taste like flour.   I am so proud she is learning ingredients.    We are having lots of fun in the kitchen and I feel better about feeding my family healthier choices.   Money is always tight but none of that seems to matter when were cooking together.     I can only hope my children are healthy in the future and that maybe some day she will love my bread.

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